The Oldest Library in the world was started by a woman
By Sabreen Syeed

The legendary Fatima al Fihri

Published in: History
Date: 03 / 07 / 17

Founded by a Muslim woman named Fatima al Fihri, the University of Al Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco, opened its doors in 859. Its library has been restored during the last three years by another woman, Canadian-Moroccan architect Aziza Chaouni.

The library houses a collection of 4,000 rare books and ancient arabic manuscripts written by renowned scholars of the region. According to the AP, the manuscripts include a 9th century version of the Quran and a manuscript on Islamic jurisprudence written by philosopher Averroes, along with an original manuscript of the magnum opus of Ibn Khaldun, Muqaddimah.

The University complex was founded as a mosque by Fatima Al-Fihri, who inherited her merchant father’s fortunes after the family moved from Al Qayrawan, or modern day Tunisia. In “The golden age of Islam,” a documentary that aired on France 5 Channel, Al-Fihri was described as a young woman fascinated by knowledge and curious about the world. She oversaw the construction of the mosque, and until her later years, attended lectures by reputed scholars who travelled to teach at the mosque school.

It is still considered a leading religious and education institution in the Muslim world. A legacy of how the first international Intellectual revolution was built equally on the contributions of devout Muslim men and women. This being something which does not go very well with the modern view of Islam. Fortunately enough, history bears witness to certain unpalatable truths.

 Today, the University of Al Qarawiyyin has moved away to another part of Fez, but the mosque and the library remain at the ancient complex.



Sabreen Syeed

About the author

A Mechanical engineer seeking to understand the fabric of reality

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